Representative Griffin Holliman.  Born on February 23, 1834 in North Carolina to parents Berry Josiah Holliman and Patience Parker Holliman, Griffin's earlier life in North Carolina found him employed as a laborer on his father's farm as noted within the 1850 Federal Census.  Agrarian skills he brought with him when he sojourned to Darlington District - Timmonsville Township, in the late 1850s. His agriculture production revealed his earnings, as an independent farmer, to be in the top third or higher in his local township.  A rating that would have caught the eye of many as the war ended and new political possibilities were being sought after the failure of the 1865 Presidential Reconstruction Act of 1865'.  In 1868, the Congressional Reconstruction Act, enacted and enforced within S.C. and the Southern Region by U.S. Military Rule, replaced the antebellum-elected government with a coalition of men of color and progressive whites.  Local constituents within Timmonsville Township sought Griffin Holliman as one to lead them into this new future.

 

 

S.C. House of Representative  (HoR) Member

The Honorable Griffin Holliman 1868' - 1870'.

Courtesy of the Holliman Family (Diana Ross) and Ancestry.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Dawn of a New Era Bgins in S.C.  In November 1869, Griffin Holliman, along with Alfred Rush, Jordan Lang, and John Boston, were elected as Darlington District House of Representative Members, while John Lunnery was elected Senator for Darlington District, as published in the Marion Star, December 1869. The election of these men served to usher in a new era of politics within S.C. and throughout the South, representing all men and women; black, white, poor, and rich.

 

Rep. Holliman's  Election Notice - December 1869'.

Courtesy of the Darlington County Historical Commission

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

* With his election to the House of Representatives, Philadelphia Township, was renamed Holloman Township, in his honor during the Reconstruction Period.  The notice was published in the Greenville Enterprise, Greenville, S.C., May 26, 1869.

 

 

 

 

Darlington County during the Reconstruction Period note Holloman Township.

                  Courtesy of the Darlington County Historical Commission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Legislative Career. Rep. Holliman served only one term in the S.C. Legislature from 1868 - 1870. During his tenure Rep. Holliman and his 

colleagues in the House of Representatives sponsored bills addressing social equality, civil rights, funding for internal domestic programs, and education.  A monumental task for that time period as well as today.

 

* The Social Equality Act of August 1868' outlawed discriminatory practices against freedmen in all businesses conducted within the state of

S.C. punishable by imprisonment -

 

 

The Social Equality Bill Notice of August 15, 1868.

Courtesy of the Charleston Daily News, Monday Morning, August 17, 1868

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

* The Gold Bill of December 1869; in accordance with the Public Credit Act of 1869, stated that bondholders who purchased bonds to help

 

finance the Civil War, 1861 - 1865, would be paid back in gold was signed on March 18, 1969.  This measure was a step to help alleviate 

 

the financial struggles faced by the U.S. after the war.  The passing of the Public Credit Act of 1869 by Congress was the first 

 

definitive piece of legislation signifying the U.S. was officially reinstating the gold standard which took effect in 1875. -

 

 

 

The Gold Bill Notice of December 11, 1869.

Courtesy of the Anderson Intelligencer, Anderson, S.C., December 23, 1869

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Rep. Holliman presented petition on behalf of J.A. Stephens of Darlington for removal of his political disabilities; i.e., his unfavorable

 

action - rebellion or insurrection-against the United States Government prior to and during the Civil War, prohibiting him from eligibility for

 

government employment, required two-third votes of each House, as stated in the 14th Amendment - Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution for

 

removal.  This application or petition was later collected by the Select Committee on Reconstruction, established in 1867.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rep. Holliman's petition notice on behalf of J.A. Stephens of Darlington for removal of his political disabilities.

Courtesy of the Charleston Daily News, January 8, 1869, Friday, Second Edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

* The mode of electing Clerks of Courts, Sheriffs, and Probate Judges Bill March 1869 notice established the criteria for which each office would be filled - election by qualified voters -

 

 

Rep. Holliman's Bill Notice - mode of electing Clerks of Courts, Sheriffs, and Probate Judges.

Courtesy of Yorkville Enquirer, March 4, 1869, York, S.C.

 

 

* The Social Equality Enforcement Bill of January 1870 to enforce the provisions of the Civil Rights Bill of the U.S. Congress and to 

 

secure to the people the benefits of a republican government in this State -

 

 

The Social Equality Enforcement Bill Notice of January 20, 1870 - introduction (left) and vote (right).

Courtesy of the Charleston Daily News, Monday Morning, January 31, 1870

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Lastly, Rep. Griffin Holliman endorsed the matriculation of black students for attendance to the University of South Carolina such as R.

Marcus DuBose on December 10, 1869 to S.C. Governor Scott, for approval, along with other Darlington County House of Representative

Members.

 

 

 

Rep. Holliman's endorsement of R. Marcus Dubose for matriculation to USC.

Courtesy of the Darlington County Historical Commission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

After the end of his congressional career, Holliman returned to farming.  He remained in the Darlington District, taking on a new venture - the turpentine distillery business - with Reuben Beasley, former Darlington District Sherriff, before the latter moved to Arkansas.  Both having failed in their venture accumulated much debt before business dissolution as noted from an October 2, 1873 Judgement.

 

 

 

Griffin Holliman vs. Reubin Beasley Business Partnership Dissolution Judgement.

Courtesy of the Darlington County Historical Commission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Rep. Griffin Holliman was married to Martha Suggs of Darlington and they had nine children - Hyram, Alice, Frances, Lizzie, Edith, Nancy,

Henrietta, Berrey J., and William T. Holliman, i.e. 1880 United States Census.  In the late 1880s, Rep Holliman and family sojourned to

Charleston, S.C. where he worked odd jobs including evangelist, canvasser, machinist, watchman, and cotton mill worker before he retired in

1900.  He, along with his family, returned to Charlotte, N.C., where he died on June 14, 1904 at the age of 71.  His beloved wife, Martha,

would follow him in 1913 at the age of 79.

 

 

 

Copyright 1973 - 2018, CRC INC. All rights reserved.